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Research support in ISAAN region- rice fields convert into sugar cane

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Dear Everyone, 

I'm a current research student from Imperial college london,  I'm now doing a research topic relate to bioenergy crops impacts on ecosystem service, and closely relate to how the ecosystem services is shifting when paddy rice fields is converted to sugar cane farm in ISAAN region, I came to Thailand for the field survey ,and needs to interview some local farmers, ( probably  20 farmers) , ranges from small farm holders to medium farm. 

But the language barriers and culture difference may not possible for me as foreigner to visit them. I know some of you may have family members who acutally own the paddy and transfer to sugar cane  farm, if there is possibility can have connection with will be greatly helpful. 

the interview questions are very simple mostly is about how this changes influence the life-sustianing products, the water, the food supply  how is diferent now? somehting like that.

 

if you will have family member who owns the farm or suger cane factory can contact with, WIll be highly appreciate with. and th research results will be published with your contribution. 

 

Look forward to hearing your suggestions

Thank you very much 

 

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You don't have to convince a myriad of local farmers. You have to convince the village-chief (poo yai baan). Having convcinced the village-chief is "half of the rent". The language barrier is one obstacle you have to overcome. The other is: "A young foreighner comes to town, trying to tell us what to do", in an environment where "what grandfather did was good, why should it not be good for us"?
You are facing an uphill battle. But good luck!
Cheers.

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      Approximately 15 years ago I bought 15 rai of land in my area (S. Buriram). It was simple rice paddy. Since then we have only used one third to grow (hom malee) rice. This rice is simply for consumption by my wife's family. None is sold on the market   

    The other 10 rai my wife rents out to a local who grows sugar cane thereon. As to what sot of profit he makes I have no idea - you would have to ask him.

    What has been very noticeable over the past few years is that a lot of rice farmers have or are switching to sugar cane. It's difficult to tell but I estimate that over the last few years at least a third, maybe more farmers have made the switch.

   With the appalling prices being offered by the millers for the last rice crop probably many more farmers will be making the swap.

   Wonder how long before there is a sugar surplus and prices tumble?

Edited by Toknarok
sp
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I dont think there will be a sugar surplus problem, the real problem and it is already and has been for some time is there is not enough milling capacity to process the cane. Trucks waiting two or three days to unload is not uncommon. Unfortunately like all other farm products produced everything is controlled by a few companies/families and they just wont open the markets to competition. 

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The main reason farmers turned their crops over to Sugar cane was the government was offering subsidies, which are no longer available?

This how I understand, information coming from wife! so may well be inaccurate??

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Much of the change of use of land for sugar cane production in the northeast of Thailand, and also around  Savannakhet Laos, has been brought about by large sugar refining companies (such as Mitr Pol and Mitr Lao) providing support for small to medium size farmers to engage in contract farming for the sugar company.  The sugar company will provide training, seed cane plants, fertilizer, heavy machinery for clearing land and harvesting/delivering to the factory.  

 

The benefit to the farmers is that they will have a fixed price and guaranteed market for their produce, the downside is that all the support given by the factory is not free and the costs will be deducted from the payment cheque at the end of the process.

 

 

 

 

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Thank you very much for your all respond, such a big help ! :) 

My research is not going to tell them what they should grow, but is going to show the positive and negative sides based on the production and facts. if  you have family who has rice farm and converted into sugar cane, please if you can recommend to me to send out a few questions please? 

it's extremely simple and not sensitive questions, if they are farmers will be very easy to answer.

I  hope to collect 20 farmers feedback,.

 

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Unfortunately you wont get any valid data from these farmers you are targeting, most are over 50 and never had much education. They have been told what and how to do most everything in their life and not the reason why by higher ups. I would suggest going to a local college with an agricultural faculty and ask one of the teachers if you could have some class time to ask the students about rice/sugar cane farming transitioning and their families exp. and reasons why they did it. Bring some snacks and drinks and a good translator to ask the questions, make them easy simple questions too as their education is sorely lacking also.

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Hello, thank you for your suggestions, but the research has to include the local farmers, and the questions are based on their production, for example " you harvest rice is for family or sell  in the market? "  you change rice fields to sugar cane because of the better income or for  sugar?   you grow sugar cane for selling in the market or for family use?  

do you use rice husk do something else?   

do you teach your children how to grow rice??

 

as for academic , i have another set of questions. 

 

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Students at ag faculties are all from family farms, they know more than the parents about the farm. I used to teach at Kalasin RMUTI which is now a university, it would be a good choice and they are def all farmers.

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Students at ag faculties are all from family farms, they know more than the parents about the farm. I used to teach at Kalasin RMUTI which is now a university, it would be a good choice and they are def all farmers.


KKU would be a better choice as it is a far better University with a good agricultural department.
And you are right, all ag students come from farmer's families and will know a lot more than the parents.

Sent from my SM-A800F using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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If you're still in need of material; we are real farmers, own lots of "rai" planted with sugarcane, about 30 of them; just converted this year from rice to sugarcane, another 50 or so, earlier.

 

PM your questions & best regards.

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BANGKOK 22 August 2018 09:33
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