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Chonburi releases wasps to combat coconut maggots

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  Yes, hope they are sure it's maggots and not red Palm Weevils, which commonly destroy not only coconut trees here but most other palms as well.  

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There must be a "sting in the tail" to this story

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They released lady bugs in Ontario to eat aphids on soybeans. Come harvest time in the fall there where million of them flying around. They would get in your house for the winter and we're a pain. I used the vacuum to suck them up. Took few years for the out breaks to diminish.

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Next they will release wasps to combat the sexpats in Pattaya. Should be fun to watch. 

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44 minutes ago, balo said:

Next they will release wasps to combat the sexpats in Pattaya. Should be fun to watch. 

WASP's do you mean ?????

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White Anglo Saxon People ? WASP's

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1 hour ago, johng said:

White Anglo Saxon People ? WASP's

it's White Anglo-Saxon Protestants.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/20/2017 at 1:08 PM, ragpicker said:

  Yes, hope they are sure it's maggots and not red Palm Weevils, which commonly destroy not only coconut trees here but most other palms as well.  

Is that the lesser of two weevils?

Edited by champers
Spellink errur
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On 5/19/2017 at 5:15 AM, jak2002003 said:

I hope these wasps are native to Thailand, because, nearly every other example of introducing some none native animal to control a pest as ended up going wrong.. with the introduced species damaging the eco system and feeding on things it was not intended to. 

 

 

Not so.  That's an incredibly pessimistic statement. With any science there are failures in the process of discovery, but there are many success stories with biological control in Thailand and around the world. It is one method of  pest control within the whole scope of IPM, Integrated Pest Management, and can be instrumental in reducing high-risk, harsh chemical pesticide use. 

The Thai Dept of Agriculture has a biological control division headed by a PhD entomologist, that has been instrumental in other projects for parasitoid cultivation and releases.  Their office in Chonburi cultivated a mini-wasp that parasitizes the coconut hispid beetle, which they released for some significant control of this non-native invasive pest in Samui and other regions.  

 

Those who are concerned about pesticides in the environment should support and advocate for IPM and biological control. 

 

For more information search: "biological control of invasive species"

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12 hours ago, drtreelove said:

Not so.  That's an incredibly pessimistic statement. With any science there are failures in the process of discovery, but there are many success stories with biological control in Thailand and around the world. It is one method of  pest control within the whole scope of IPM, Integrated Pest Management, and can be instrumental in reducing high-risk, harsh chemical pesticide use. 

The Thai Dept of Agriculture has a biological control division headed by a PhD entomologist, that has been instrumental in other projects for parasitoid cultivation and releases.  Their office in Chonburi cultivated a mini-wasp that parasitizes the coconut hispid beetle, which they released for some significant control of this non-native invasive pest in Samui and other regions.  

 

Those who are concerned about pesticides in the environment should support and advocate for IPM and biological control. 

 

For more information search: "biological control of invasive species"

Wow... do you work for the Thai Dept of Agriculture?

 

 

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  I believe the "maggots" they are referring to are in fact the larvae of the Red Palm Weevil.  One of the most damaging pests in the world, yet Thai's breed them to sell the larvae for consumption :sad:.

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We get them sometimes in our coconut and foxtail trees after warm weather, These are the guys:

 

 

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BANGKOK 20 October 2017 23:03
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