Jump to content
Thailand Visa Forum by Thai Visa | The Nation
Hummin

How to remove rubber trees?

Recommended Posts

Spend your money on fertilizer, The locals make crazy decisions sometimes. The trees look healthy enough, why wouldn't they make rubber?

Maybe a rubber tree guy will spot this thread and let us know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hummin said:

I was told they tried producing here, and have given up, but if you are right, I will give it a try and see how it goes. The idea is to plant teak, but if possible to produce 60k pr rai a year, that is pretty good. 

60k per rai is the asking price for the land?

 

Look at the trees to see if they've opened up the bark and tried to tap.

 

You can get a half-decent return on 1,000 trees after waiting a couple of years, clearing and fertilizing.

 

We're on our first proper year tapping same, around 1,000 trees, opened last November, stopped February this year.

 

Production was slow as the trees take a while to get flowing and only tapped every 3rd day but we still managed 45,000B  in 3 slow months split between us and the tappers.

 

Still slow now due to lousy tappers and the rain but, hey, we'll gey going properly again soon.

 

Try posting questions in the Rubber Tree topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those trees are quite small ... they are immature ... not 6 year old yet ...  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had some rubber tree land in Phuket, immature 10-year old trees that were a little stunted and not growing as fast as the trees just across the road.

 

It was free to remove all the trees and stumps - the people who removed the trees sold the wood.

 

So I can't see why you should pay someone to remove your trees and stumps - the wood has value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017-5-20 at 8:46 AM, Hummin said:

There is chemicals that can be used or machines for removing the trees and roots. But it is costly. 

 

We have not bought the land yet, and I need to figure out how to do with timber, if the soil is toxic by arsenic, is the soil stil good for fruit and vegetables? 

 

Anyone with experience buying an old rubber treenplantation, and shutting it down? 

 

What about ground water? Can it be containmated? Timber?

 

They offered us the land for 60 000,- a rai, and I am wondering if we going to start on 45. But if to much trouble, we will ditch the plan. 

Why would you think the soil has arsenic in it,close to an old mine?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, steven100 said:

Those trees are quite small ... they are immature ... not 6 year old yet ...  

I dont think the tress have been fertilized at all , let alone regularly....hence why they look younger maybe. if the guy gave up on them, for sure they havent been fertilized...

Properly looked after, these trees will produce an income soon enough. IMO

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

That picture could of be taken down the best rows.

I must say not sure what you will gain by planting teak if you think the rubber won't do well.

When i cleared some land years back,we thought we had good timber trees for house making only to find 80 percent were hollowed  out in the centre.

Edited by farmerjo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

We have given them an offer for the land, and if accepted we just have to see what to do next. If possible we might keep the rubber, and just clear land for a new pond, house road etc. Funny how it works, now we just got offered 19 rai more :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 31 HP four wheel drive diesel Yanmar tractor. Our house sits on 2.5 rai and back of the house was a jungle. My tractor  was spinning all four wheels trying to take out 2 and 3 inch trees. I didn't want to abuse my tractor so we hired a big Ford tractor and he had problems also. He was willing to abuse the rental tractor by hitting the trees at speed. Even that was a slow process. He broke a front wheel off taking out a huge termite mound.  I still recommend an excavator for tree and stump removal. It's cheaper in the long run provided that you have enough work for the excavator.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I see used excavotors all the way in to Bkk, cant be that expensive to buy? And the hour prices is around 2000-6000. I guess I will have the right man for the job, if I buy one. 

Edited by Hummin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, Hummin said:

I see used excavotors all the way in to Bkk, cant be that expensive to buy? And the hour prices is around 2000-6000. I guess I will have the right man for the job, if I buy one. 

 

My wife has a number of small farms, actually 65 rai in total. There is always some excavating work to do. I  remember the first one SHE hired cost 1,200 baht per hour. The owner was by no means a good operator. That ended up being an expensive mistake. A local guy has a large Cat excavator, he now charges 1,800 baht per hour. He is an artist with never a wasted move. He is now the only guy we will use. It's fun to watch him work. Pure poetry in motion with all smooth moves except when he shakes the stuck mud out of the bucket.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hummin said:

I see used excavotors all the way in to Bkk, cant be that expensive to buy? And the hour prices is around 2000-6000. I guess I will have the right man for the job, if I buy one. 

A mini excavator in good nick with around 5,000 hours will set you back around 400k B.

 

If you are looking then wear signs are:

 

Track pins

Drive sprockets

Slew travel

Bucket fit

Hydraulic oil leaks (hoses and rams)

Noisy drive train (make the seller take plate covers off, check gearing for wear and lack of lubrication)

Ram pins (again look for signs of good lube - there should be a grease gun behind the seat)

 

Engine

 

Check air filter (usually blocked with dust, that's why they're usually run with the bonnet open)

Usual engine signs of care (neglect)

Hydraulic pump check oil level, leaks, signs of repair.

 

Mini diggers are great and sufficient for a small farm. Had mine 18 months, wouldn't be without it, loads of useage.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first excavator that we hired looked to have a weak hydraulic pump I didn't have near the digging power that it should have had. Even considering the poor operator and how slow he was, he couldn't have made any money because he often needed to shut down to add hydraulic oil. I think every cylinder had serious leaks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was told they tried producing here, and have given up, but if you are right, I will give it a try and see how it goes. The idea is to plant teak, but if possible to produce 60k pr rai a year, that is pretty good. 

Yeah, the old Thai fairy tale... We tried but it didn't work.
Because they have NO IDEA !!!
In your case, as already suggested, keep the trees as they will be productive soon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CLW said:


Yeah, the old Thai fairy tale... We tried but it didn't work.
Because they have NO IDEA !!!
In your case, as already suggested, keep the trees as they will be productive soon

Just to reiterate though, I wasn't saying you could make THB60k per rai per year from rubber, rather that was the cost of land per rai. Still pretty good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 19 October 2017 16:04
Sponsors
×