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Woman fell 'too close to train' for driver to stop in time, says Airport Rail Link operator

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19 hours ago, samsensam said:

 

if you watch the video she is on the racks for almost a minute before the train arrives, there are loads of people on the platform but all they do is stand and stare, no one does anything to help her or stop the train.

You've already been corrected as it is just under 15 seconds. However, the point is still valid. I watched it a number of times yesterday and was similarly dismayed at the lack of reaction.

 

The whole thing is very tragic especially given that she was pregnant. Not one person attempts to even get close to communicate with her let alone TRY to assist her.

 

Granted that it takes everyone within close proximity a few seconds to realise what has happened, but there is ample time to for someone to jump down and drag her off the rail. There is actually a pit space between both tracks for this exact scenario if anyone was ever trapped between two trains. One could even lie directly between the tracks as be safe as the train arrives, ie. not be hit, although I wouldn't expect anyone to quickly think of this in such circumstances.

 

There are numerous examples in many countries of people rescuing fallen pax onto tracks in under 10 secs. I've had the experience of witnessing exactly this at a suburban station many years ago.

 

It is of course easy to express this view not having been there at the time. However, I cannot imagine for a moment that if this happened in many other countries where I have lived and worked that not one single person would not try to assist her.

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35 minutes ago, KhunBENQ said:

After reading today's news that want to declare it as an accident:

 

1) I again watched the video and nothing changes in my conclusion.

That was not fainted/stumbled over the curb.

It was like a "dive" trying to fall as far into the track bed as possible.

 

2) There might be good reason to deny/censor the reality.

 

First to avoid "attracting" other suicidal persons to do similar.

Such events are never published in such detail - if at all - in Germany e.g. You would only hear in traffic radio that there is a police operation at a station.

 

Second is that the family would receive a high compensation if it is declared an "accident".

If it serves that purpose then it be granted to them.

I don't understand the need to speculate regarding whether it was intentional or not? What purpose does it serve you? And it is purely that, speculation. 

I could provide just as many good reasons why it is clearly not the conclusion that you believe that it is.

 

To me the issue of intention or accident is neither here nor there. My main concern is that this woman could have been saved, the time and opportunity was there. Yet, unfortunately, no one on the platform nearby seemingly displayed an inclination to attempt to save her life. 

 

The fact is that the whole incident is tragic.

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1 minute ago, Lakegeneve said:

The whole thing is very tragic especially given that she was pregnant. Not one person attempts to even get close to communicate with her let alone TRY to assist her.

Quote

There are numerous examples in many countries of people rescuing fallen pax onto tracks in under 10 secs. I've had the experience of witnessing exactly this at a suburban station many years ago.

Do not apply Western logic to a uniquely Thai / Asian situation.

 

Nobody tried to assist her probably out of the potential risk of being implicated themselves.


What if somebody had tried to help her, pull her back, but she went ahead, jumped and died anyways?
This would open up a whole can of worms, with the good Samaritan being implicated, despite their honest intentions.

 

This is somewhat similar to the mock jaywalking incidents that happen across China, with mostly older Chinese people,

who deliberately jump in front of buses at busy crossings to illicit monetary compensation by implicating the driver.

 

Other times, they will prostate themselves on the ground feigning injury, and implicate any passerby who happens to stop and assist them.

 

Greed and money are the most common reasons.


Obviously this case is different, but the following still applies - NO, it does not pay to be a good Samaritan in Asia.
 

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3 minutes ago, varun said:

Do not apply Western logic to a uniquely Thai / Asian situation.

 

Nobody tried to assist her probably out of the potential risk of being implicated themselves.


What if somebody had tried to help her, pull her back, but she went ahead, jumped and died anyways?
This would open up a whole can of worms, with the good Samaritan being implicated, despite their honest intentions.
Obviously this case is different, but the following still applies - NO, it does not pay to be a good Samaritan in Asia.
 

This sort of reply is perhaps reflective of a standard laziness. Also, you seem to be assuming I am applying western logic ...whatever that is?

 

Of course, most  on the platform didn't assist due to their own fear of potential risk, that is fairly self evident. The point is that no one on this platform even tried to help, seemingly no one even tried to communicate and yell at her to get up let alone rescue her. I even expected to see the station guard running down the platform as the train approaches. 

 

There are plenty of situations where Thais (I'm not going to lump all asian people together,) do intervene and at the very least try to help others. Especially, in a gender context of a guy helping a women in distress - that is almost a mythical coming of age scenario in Thai culture.  

 

I'd suggest that all who have been here long enough of us have seen and experienced situations where a Thai has been a good Samaritan as much as we have seen and experienced the opposite.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Lakegeneve said:

This sort of reply is perhaps reflective of a standard laziness. Also, you seem to be assuming I am applying western logic ...whatever that is?

 

Of course, most  on the platform didn't assist due to their own fear of potential risk, that is fairly self evident. The point is that no one on this platform even tried to help, seemingly no one even tried to communicate and yell at her to get up let alone rescue her. I even expected to see the station guard running down the platform as the train approaches. 

 

There are plenty of situations where Thais (I'm not going to lump all asian people together,) do intervene and at the very least try to help others. Especially, in a gender context of a guy helping a women in distress - that is almost a mythical coming of age scenario in Thai culture.  

 

I'd suggest that all who have been here long enough of us have seen and experienced situations where a Thai has been a good Samaritan as much as we have seen and experienced the opposite.

 

 

There is no question of laziness, however, you are welcome to be a sucker if that is what you wish.

 

50 minutes ago, Lakegeneve said:

I don't understand the need to speculate regarding whether it was intentional or not? What purpose does it serve you? And it is purely that, speculation. 

I could provide just as many good reasons why it is clearly not the conclusion that you believe that it is.

 

To me the issue of intention or accident is neither here nor there. My main concern is that this woman could have been saved, the time and opportunity was there. Yet, unfortunately, no one on the platform nearby seemingly displayed an inclination to attempt to save her life. 

 

The fact is that the whole incident is tragic.

1) People who are a danger to themselves and have a death-wish generally can't be saved

 

2) Count the number of times you have seen a fatal / near fatal traffic accident in Thailand - a

    And then count the number of times you have seen a crowd gathering around said accident - b

    And then count the number of people out of this crowd who appeared to be willing to help - c

    And then count the number of people who appear to be willing to help, who actually helped - d

    Express d as a % of a, what % did you come up with?

 

3) The value of human life in Thailand, is less than that of a dog. Harsh as it sounds, that is the reality.

 

 

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Be happy in your next life.

coffin.jpg

 

Overcome the grief

(mother, father, brother)

family.jpg

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BANGKOK 20 November 2017 22:29
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