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UAE says it is headed for 'long estrangement' with Qatar

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ID: 1   Posted

UAE says it is headed for 'long estrangement' with Qatar

 

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FILE PHOTO: A man walks on the corniche in Doha, Qatar, June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Naseem Zeitoon/File Photo/

 

DUBAI (Reuters) - There will be no quick end to the row between Qatar and the four states boycotting it including the United Arab Emirates, the UAE minister of state for foreign affairs wrote on his official Twitter account on Friday.

 

"We are headed for a long estrangement ... we are very far from a political solution involving a change in Qatar's course, and in light of that nothing will change and we have to look for a different format of relations," Anwar al-Gargash said.

 

The statement suggested no breakthrough in the situation after U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson left the Gulf on Thursday following a three-day tour of Gulf Arab countries aimed at easing the worst dispute among U.S.-allied Arab states in years.

 

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt cut diplomatic and transport ties with Qatar on June 5, accusing it of supporting terrorism and regional arch-foe Iran, charges Doha denies.

 

During his Doha visit, Tillerson signed a U.S.-Qatari accord on terrorism financing in an effort to help ease the crisis, but Qatar's opponents said it fell short of allaying their concerns.

 

The State Department said on Thursday that Tillerson hoped the parties in the dispute could soon negotiate face-to-face.

 

"Based on his meetings, the secretary believes that getting the parties to talk directly to one another would be an important next step," State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert told reporters.

 

"We hope the parties will agree to do so."

 

(Reporting by Mohamed el Sherif and Noah Browning; Editing by Sandra Maler and Peter Cooney)

 
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-- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-14

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ID: 3   Posted

What a short memory and loyalty the Emirates have when it was Qatari money that raised the UAE out of the sand dunes and helped turn Dubai from the fishing village it was to its present state of "utopia" :sick:

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ID: 4   Posted (edited)

23 hours ago, Andaman Al said:

What a short memory and loyalty the Emirates have

No one in the "Middle East" has a short memory. Quite the contrary. This latest spat could be about something that happened hundred of years ago but now the time is right.

 

Could be about something as trivial as a Qatari drinking out of an Emirati well, without permission. 

 

I suspect that the price of natural gas which is where Qatar gets its money has not dropped in price as much as oil. The Saudis want to wear the largest trouser in that part of the world but their coffers and dwindling. While the Qatari coffers may not be to the same extent.

 

<<<< Off topic comments removed to prevent further off topic discussion >>>>

Edited by metisdead

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ID: 5   Posted

46 minutes ago, VocalNeal said:

No one in the "Middle East" has a short memory. Quite the contrary. This latest spat could be about something that happened hundred of years ago but now the time is right.

 

Could be about something as trivial as a Qatari drinking out of an Emirati well, without permission. 

 

I suspect that the price of natural gas which is where Qatar gets its money has not dropped in price as much as oil. The Saudis want to wear the largest trouser in that part of the world but their coffers and dwindling. While the Qatari coffers may not be to the same extent.

 

Saudi war with Yemen is the same. Yemen has more oil reserves than most of the Middle East combined but Saudi does not want than to be able to develop them.

 

"No one in the "Middle East" has a short memory. Quite the contrary. This latest spat could be about something that happened hundred of years ago but now the time is right.

 

Could be about something as trivial as a Qatari drinking out of an Emirati well, without permission."

 

You got any more examples of clichéd thinking? 

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ID: 6   Posted

Good , I can continue to eat  cherries from Lebanon and eggs from Iran

 

Think Qatars resolve was underestimated by the other GCC nations

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ID: 7   Posted

4 minutes ago, Dave67 said:

Good , I can continue to eat  cherries from Lebanon and eggs from Iran

 

Think Qatars resolve was underestimated by the other GCC nations

No Turkish cherries? That's where cherries began.

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ID: 8   Posted

15 minutes ago, ilostmypassword said:

No Turkish cherries? That's where cherries began.

I checked they are from Lebanon , Turkish milk , bread , Yogurts ect. No hardship at all. The government provide cheap arabic bread 10 for about 9bt which is quite tasty when warmed in a pan. That price is all of the time not just now. So they look after their poor as well as spending billions on world cup projects

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ID: 9   Posted

3 hours ago, boomerangutang said:

I still think the primary basis for the bad blood is Al-Jazeera, which is hosted by Qatar.

 

the old adage; 'The pen is mightier than the sword' fits.

 

Other Arab peninsula countries gained confidence by Trump's recent visit.  It's no secret that Trump hates a free press, and is doing all he can to put all not-right-wing US media out of business. Within a day or two after Trump's entourage left S.Arabia, the full court press against Qatar was put in motion.  Note: Egypt is a big player in the coalition bullying little Qatar.  UAE is a little spot on the map, but it's trying to gain credence with its bigger neighbors by appearing bullish against fellow tiny-dot-on-map Qatar.

 

In the M.East, you can harbor and/or send mass murderers overseas, no problem.  You can also praise an Ayatollah who says it's ok for a man to force sex on a little girl as long as he doesn't penetrate beyond the crown of his penis (yes, Iran's revered Ayatollah actually wrote that), .......but if you print something non-laudatory about a Saudi royal - watch out!

 

And I still think your grasp of ME affairs is sketchy. Quoting Old adages notwithstanding.

 

Both sides to this conflict play a PR game using catchy labels. The Saudi camp is pushing the "supporting terrorism" and "ties to Iran" slogans, while Qatar highlights supposed freedom of press etc. Buying into it is a choice, and not surprisingly, one which people tend to make based on uninformed preconceptions or irrelevant political positions.

 

There's not real explanation given to the assertion that Egypt is "a big player in this coalition. There''s not much substance or accuracy when it comes to describing the UAE as just trying gain credence with "bigger neighbors". There's little merit to using images such as "little Qatar". Qatar punches way above it's size when it comes to regional affairs, and it does interfere, one way or another with the domestic affairs of various countries in the region. It was just a question of time as to when it would be slapped. 

 

How the last incoherent paragraph even begins to relate to those above is mystery.

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1 hour ago, ilostmypassword said:

No Turkish cherries? That's where cherries began.

 

There's a saying in the ME (comes in different versions) that ________ (enter name of fruit) are better following wars. That's mostly aired in connection with pomegranates and olives, I think, but recall it being used by a Lebanese "explaining" why their fruits are "the best". When it came to cherries, I was inclined to agree.  

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4 minutes ago, Morch said:

 

And I still think your grasp of ME affairs is sketchy. Quoting Old adages notwithstanding.

 

Both sides to this conflict play a PR game using catchy labels. The Saudi camp is pushing the "supporting terrorism" and "ties to Iran" slogans, while Qatar highlights supposed freedom of press etc. Buying into it is a choice, and not surprisingly, one which people tend to make based on uninformed preconceptions or irrelevant political positions.

 

There's not real explanation given to the assertion that Egypt is "a big player in this coalition. There''s not much substance or accuracy when it comes to describing the UAE as just trying gain credence with "bigger neighbors". There's little merit to using images such as "little Qatar". Qatar punches way above it's size when it comes to regional affairs, and it does interfere, one way or another with the domestic affairs of various countries in the region. It was just a question of time as to when it would be slapped. 

 

How the last incoherent paragraph even begins to relate to those above is mystery.

"Qatar punches way above it's size when it comes to regional affairs, and it does interfere, one way or another with the domestic affairs of various countries in the region. It was just a question of time as to when it would be slapped."

 

"interfere"? On the one hand it certainly covers Qatar's support of Al Nusra in Syria. But does it really apply to Al Jazeera's friendly coverage of the Muslim Brotherhood? I'm sure the Egyptians and Saudis feel that way. Not so sure that others believe it should apply to press coverage. 

 

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1 hour ago, Dave67 said:

Good , I can continue to eat  cherries from Lebanon and eggs from Iran

 

Think Qatars resolve was underestimated by the other GCC nations

 

1 hour ago, Dave67 said:

I checked they are from Lebanon , Turkish milk , bread , Yogurts ect. No hardship at all. The government provide cheap arabic bread 10 for about 9bt which is quite tasty when warmed in a pan. That price is all of the time not just now. So they look after their poor as well as spending billions on world cup projects

 

It's a question of how long sanctions will be in place and how strict the sanctions regime will be. Doubt that Saudi Arabia and it's gang were not aware of Qatar's options regarding supplies. Not putting more effort into blocking these options from the outset of the conflict can be interpreted as a sign of keeping the push within certain bounds. Lets hope it stays this way.

 

If and when Qatar's opponents attempt to tighten the blockade, apply more pressure on countries aiding Qatar - things may change. The "resolve", on both sides (which I prefer to call "stubbornness") is less of a real sentiment, but more a face and bargaining position thing. Don't see Qatar's "resolve" as being more underestimated than Qatar's underestimation of the Saudi "resolve" in addressing the long standing issues between the countries.

 

Still early days on this.

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8 minutes ago, ilostmypassword said:

"Qatar punches way above it's size when it comes to regional affairs, and it does interfere, one way or another with the domestic affairs of various countries in the region. It was just a question of time as to when it would be slapped."

 

"interfere"? On the one hand it certainly covers Qatar's support of Al Nusra in Syria. But does it really apply to Al Jazeera's friendly coverage of the Muslim Brotherhood? I'm sure the Egyptians and Saudis feel that way. Not so sure that others believe it should apply to press coverage. 

 

 

Painting the issue as "Al Jazeera's friendly coverage of the Muslim Brotherhood" is a pretty shallow take on things. Al Jazeera coverage of regional affairs, especially when it comes to its Arabic edition goes farther than that, And if you imagine that rival media outlets are allowed similar practices within Qatar, think again.

 

That you apply Western concepts relating to press coverage and freedom of press with regard to Al Jazeera's role in the region is great. Now there's just this reality of it being owned and controlled by the Qatari regime. If we could only ignore that and present it as an agent of Western ideals, that'd be awesome.

 

The ME is not the West. The same rules do not apply.

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4 hours ago, boomerangutang said:

I still think the primary basis for the bad blood is Al-Jazeera, which is hosted by Qatar.

 

the old adage; 'The pen is mightier than the sword' fits.

 

Other Arab peninsula countries gained confidence by Trump's recent visit.  It's no secret that Trump hates a free press, and is doing all he can to put all not-right-wing US media out of business. Within a day or two after Trump's entourage left S.Arabia, the full court press against Qatar was put in motion.  Note: Egypt is a big player in the coalition bullying little Qatar.  UAE is a little spot on the map, but it's trying to gain credence with its bigger neighbors by appearing bullish against fellow tiny-dot-on-map Qatar.

 

In the M.East, you can harbor and/or send mass murderers overseas, no problem.  You can also praise an Ayatollah who says it's ok for a man to force sex on a little girl as long as he doesn't penetrate beyond the crown of his penis (yes, Iran's revered Ayatollah actually wrote that), .......but if you print something non-laudatory about a Saudi royal - watch out!

The topic has nothing to do with Trump, does not mention his name at all in the OP.

 

Time to get over it.

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4 hours ago, VocalNeal said:

Could be about something as trivial as a Qatari drinking out of an Emirati well, without permission. 

 

 

 

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