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Hua Hin lives up to its name as sea level lowest in 18 years

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Hua Hin lives up to its name as sea level lowest in 18 years

 

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HUA HIN: -- Environmentalists said that the sea levels in Hua Hin were at their lowest levels for 18 years yesterday - but it was nothing to worry about.

 

Rocks that are normally covered by the sea emerged in full view and many boats couldn't get out to sea as they were stranded.

 

The Pattaya ferry departure was delayed until the late afternoon by the phenomenon.

 

Scientist Bamrungsak Chatananthawet said that it was a natural occurrence and there was no danger to coral or marine life.

 

Rocks were visible on a large area from Hua Hin to Bang Saphan Noi.

 

Hua Hin literally means "head rock" in Thai.

 

Source: Thai News Agency

 
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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2017-07-26
 

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Umm, won't the tides be much low again next month around the 21-23 of August as the new moon starts again? As I recall from  grade school there is a relationship between the gravitational  forces of the moon combined with those of the  sun, with the moon pulling the water.  

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Where did all the water go?

By The Nation

 

88d3b27b2d2ad9fec7e6caf2bb045db6-atwb.jp

 

HUA HIN: -- In a phenomenon seen only once every 18 years, the tide level dropped dramatically along the Prachuap Khiri Khan shore on Tuesday afternoon, revealing the sea bed and coral.


Passengers on the Hua Hin-Pattaya ferry had plenty of time to snap photos of the unusual sight when their departure time was postponed from 1 to 4pm.

 

The low tide was most apparent between Hua Hin Beach and Bang Saphan Noi district, where fishing boats docking in the Khao Takiab Canal came close to resting on its muddy bottom. 

 

The tide was lowest from noon to 1pm and the phenomenon was expected to recur at the same time on Wednesday and Thursday. 

 

Bumrungchat Chat-ananthawet, director of the Institute for Research and Development of Marine Resources and Coastal Mangrove, said the plunging tide level was a natural phenomenon that takes place every 18 years, each time lasting several days and for 1-3 hours a day. 

 

He said it doesn’t harm the coral or other marine life, which are able to adjust. 

 

But he warned anyone taking pictures to avoid stepping on coral or otherwise disturbing the marine ecosystem.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30321841

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-07-26

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5 hours ago, geriatrickid said:

Umm, won't the tides be much low again next month around the 21-23 of August as the new moon starts again? As I recall from  grade school there is a relationship between the gravitational  forces of the moon combined with those of the  sun, with the moon pulling the water.  

The pull of the moon varies according to its position relative to the Earth. The bulge (high tide) caused by the moon and sun moves north and south. The moon can be nearer to Earth in its orbit, causing a higher bulge. Obstruction by land contributes to higher tides, but is not a factor in this monthly variation.

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Or as the farangs the radio here call it...

 

Why hin

 

Kind of embarrassing how they can't pronounce the town name right lolol

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I wonder what all these super clever environment guys who always tell you costal areas will be flooded are going to tell you this time.

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2 hours ago, hhinhh said:

I wonder what all these super clever environment guys who always tell you costal areas will be flooded are going to tell you this time.

Coastal areas will be flooded. Just be patient.

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10 hours ago, hhinhh said:

I wonder what all these super clever environment guys who always tell you costal areas will be flooded are going to tell you this time.

 

They'd probably tell you that you're confusing a normal low tide caused by the relative positions of the sun, moon and earth with the overall rise in sea levels due to an increase in temperature that's melting an awful lot of the water locked up as polar and glacial ice.

 

Kind of like they'd tell you that the arrival of winter in the northern hemisphere doesn't mean the earth is getting colder.

 

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I'm confused.  Is the moon at an 18 year 'far away' distance making a real low tide?  I get it when some insects have hatching cycles that span years or decades like locusts, but aren't the tides pretty regular year-to-year?

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5 hours ago, coldmike said:

I'm confused.  Is the moon at an 18 year 'far away' distance making a real low tide?  I get it when some insects have hatching cycles that span years or decades like locusts, but aren't the tides pretty regular year-to-year?

No. When there is an unusually high tide somewhere on Earth, somewhere else has an unusually low tide. Imagine Earth's water is a big ball of dough. Stretch it a little in one direction, and it gets narrower somewhere else. The total volume of water doesn't change, just the shape. The distortion is very slight compared to the size of the planet, but looks like a high tide when you're beside it on Earth. The moon being closer would contribute to both higher and lower tides.

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