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Wife's Thai I.D. wrong name......after 29 years???

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Tanoshi    162
Just now, ubonjoe said:

She is still a Thai national since she has a valid Thai ID card. All she has to do is go to a passport office and get a new passport.

Then fly out to a neighboring country using the US passport to depart the country and then re-enter using her Thai passport.

In theory Yes, in practice, No.

 

When the Thai tries to re-enter using their Thai ID, they have no exit stamp, or entry card.

The puzzled IO asks how they managed to leave the Country.

Foreign passport, with exit stamp.

The IO insists that since they left on a foreign passport and there is no record of departing as a Thai, the same passport must be used to re-enter, and so the circle continues.

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ICECOOL    188
13 hours ago, OJAS said:

In which case he'd better brace himself for having to surmount formidable hurdles in communicating with them since immigration officers' grasp of the English language tends to be minimal (at best) or completely non-existent (at worst) in my experience. That is one of the reasons why I always get my wife to accompany me to my local office at retirement extension of stay time.

While my gf accompanies me to do retirement extension at HH I do the lot. She sits outside usually. But it seems different everywhere.

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ubonjoe    17,711
12 minutes ago, Tanoshi said:

In theory Yes, in practice, No.

 

When the Thai tries to re-enter using their Thai ID, they have no exit stamp, or entry card.

The puzzled IO asks how they managed to leave the Country.

Foreign passport, with exit stamp.

The IO insists that since they left on a foreign passport and there is no record of departing as a Thai, the same passport must be used to re-enter, and so the circle continues.

Not really correct. The officer cannot force a Thai to use the other passport.

With the auto gates for Thai's now it even less of problem. Just fill out a new card and use it.

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Tanoshi    162
Just now, ubonjoe said:

Not really correct. The officer cannot force a Thai to use the other passport.

With the auto gates for Thai's now it even less of problem. Just fill out new entry card and use it.

The auto entry gates won't let you enter on a Thai passport, if you didn't exit on that passport.

The bio metric information doesn't match that recorded of a Thai exiting the Country.

 

There is no matching departure card, if you just complete a new arrival card portion.

The barcode on the arrival portion can't match with a record of departure on the same barcode.

 

You will be referred to an IO for entry, in the interest of national security and to confirm your ID.

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ubonjoe    17,711
2 minutes ago, Tanoshi said:

The auto entry gates won't let you enter on a Thai passport, if you didn't exit on that passport.

The bio metric information doesn't match that recorded of a Thai exiting the Country.

 

There is no matching departure card, if you just complete a new arrival card portion.

The barcode on the arrival portion can't match with a record of departure on the same barcode.

 

You will be referred to an IO for entry, in the interest of national security and to confirm your ID.

Who told you that nonsense.

The only Thais that are denied entry using a valid Thai passport are ones that just accept the BS from an immigration officer.

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abrahamzvi    563
21 hours ago, tonray said:

Isn't the passport enough, why even present a Thai ID? 

I assume the marriage has been registered in Thailand and therefore the married surname had to be changed. In the old days when Thai ladies married to foreigners were not able to buy land in Thailand (this law has been changed in the early 2000), many such ladies had their name changed in their passports if they lived abroad, but left their maiden name on their ID,

to enable them to purchase land in Thailand when they were there. Whilst registering their marriage abroad and having the Thai Embassies/Consulates change their names on the Passports, their IDs were not touched. This practice, which was known to the Thai embassies/consultes, is not practiced, or allowed now, as there is no reason for this.

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BEVUP    274
2 hours ago, ubonjoe said:

You need to go back and read the post where he states she is getting an extension as his dependent because she used her US passport to enter the country.

I think the problem is that her US passport has her married name and her Thai ID card has her maiden name.

Your right Joe & as I mentioned If she entered on the American PP would be another matter ( I think OP should of stated that straight up) & now all of a sudden she encountered a IO on a bad day (maybe pay back for not going with the Thai citz.

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Tanoshi    162
1 hour ago, ubonjoe said:

Who told you that nonsense.

The only Thais that are denied entry using a valid Thai passport are ones that just accept the BS from an immigration officer.

I agree totally with your sentiments and opinion.

 

The fact remains that most Thais are clueless regarding their own laws and even less reluctant to lose 'face' in front of an official they regard as a superior, and (supposedly) more knowledgeable than themselves. They don't like confrontation especially in public areas.

 

A foreigner may demand to see a superior and make a stand, but very few Thais will.

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tryasimight    267
9 hours ago, lopburi3 said:

Very bad advice from that attorney if you were already married I fear.  Perhaps best to end my posting here.

If he thinks he's having problems now.....he wants to hope the US never discover the fraudulent fiancee visa and the act of bigamy that occurred in that country. Thailand immigration will be the least of his worries.

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BritTim    3,963
2 hours ago, tryasimight said:

If he thinks he's having problems now.....he wants to hope the US never discover the fraudulent fiancee visa and the act of bigamy that occurred in that country. Thailand immigration will be the least of his worries.

While the fraudulent fiance visa might indeed be an issue, I do not think you can be accused of bigamy over executing a superfluous marriage to someone you are already married to.

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Maestro    3,082
On 10/08/2017 at 9:15 AM, TGIR said:

...we went to the Immigration office for our 12th annual O-Retirement extension.  All the paperwork was prepared and in order, as it has been every year... "They know we're married and it's clear on our paperwork that the I.D. card and her passport have different names (one before marriage, one after)"...

 

 

This is the first time I hear that a foreigner who happens to have a Thai wife and applies for a one-year extension of stay for the reason of retirement (retirement extension) must be accompanied by his wife and his wife must present her Thai ID card and her passport.

 

It is also the first time I hear that a Thai woman whose foreign husband applies for a retirement extension must be in possession of a passport.

 

What immigration office is it that has these weird requirements for the retirement extension?

 

P.S. I see from this later post of yours that your wife has chosen to live with you in Thailand as a US national and apparently applies for her own one-year extensions of stay as your dependent under clause 2.20 of Police Order 327/2557. If this is the case, I cannot understand why she has to show her Thai ID card for her application for extension, as it is not a requirement for a US national to have a Thai ID card. She has created a big confusion by using documents relating to both her nationalities for her application.

 

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BritTim    3,963
4 hours ago, Maestro said:

... I cannot understand why she has to show her Thai ID card for her application for extension, as it is not a requirement for a US national to have a Thai ID card. She has created a big confusion by using documents relating to both her nationalities for her application.

I think the issue is that she is applying for an extension of stay as a returning Thai citizen. To do this, she needs to prove that she is an existing (or former) Thai citizen. Her US passport does not demonstrate this.

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TGIR    137
16 hours ago, tryasimight said:

If he thinks he's having problems now.....he wants to hope the US never discover the fraudulent fiancee visa and the act of bigamy that occurred in that country. Thailand immigration will be the least of his worries.

 

tryasimight, you might just want to tune down the rhetoric a bit.  I did not commit an act of bigamy, which per the dictionary is the act of going through a marriage ceremony while already married to another person.  No did I commit a fraudulent act in obtaining the Fiance Visa.  She wasn't married lawfully in the United States at the time of application for the Visa.  If you want to argue about something that happened three decades ago I guess that's your problem, not mine.

 

We obtained the Fiance Visa at the recommendation of a qualified Thai attorney, and I doubt the American government would give a crap if we were married in Bangkok or Kathmandu.  We followed the rules of the Fiance Visa to the letter.  The rules are that you have 90 days to marry or return to your home country.

 

My wife was a thirty one year old single woman who had never been married.  It isn't likely that I would have received the family's approval to take her to America without going through a proper Thai marriage first.  It could have taken up to two years to submit ourselves to the process of bringing a new Thai bride to the U.S. according to our attorney.  I doubt he would have suggested the route we took if it were illegal.  Why would a practicing attorney do that?  A little legal sleight of hand is not a criminal offense.

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tryasimight    267
4 minutes ago, TGIR said:

 

tryasimight, you might just want to tune down the rhetoric a bit.  I did not commit an act of bigamy, which per the dictionary is the act of going through a marriage ceremony while already married to another person.  No did I commit a fraudulent act in obtaining the Fiance Visa.  She wasn't married lawfully in the United States at the time of application for the Visa.  If you want to argue about something that happened three decades ago I guess that's your problem, not mine.

 

We obtained the Fiance Visa at the recommendation of a qualified Thai attorney, and I doubt the American government would give a crap if we were married in Bangkok or Kathmandu.  We followed the rules of the Fiance Visa to the letter.  The rules are that you have 90 days to marry or return to your home country.

 

My wife was a thirty one year old single woman who had never been married.  It isn't likely that I would have received the family's approval to take her to America without going through a proper Thai marriage first.  It could have taken up to two years to submit ourselves to the process of bringing a new Thai bride to the U.S. according to our attorney.  I doubt he would have suggested the route we took if it were illegal.  Why would a practicing attorney do that?  A little legal sleight of hand is not a criminal offense.

I have no argument either way, merely pointing out that if you were in fact legally married and thus obtained a fiancee visa fraudulently then everything done after that is null and void.

Did you get married at the Amphur or just a ceremonial village event? If it was a village event only then you were never married and all is good.

 

Anyway....keep your happy thoughts and good luck.

 

 

BTW my visa agent insisted I DO NOT get married before trying to bring my lady to Australia for the same reasons as you mention. And we did not. She went there and we got married just the once to keep it legal.

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abrahamzvi    563
On 8/10/2017 at 3:24 PM, ubonjoe said:

I cannot see what the problem with immigration is. It is perfectly legal for her to keep her maiden name after marriage.

She does not need to do anything at the US embassy since her passport is in her married name. There are no Thai embassies here in the country.

All she has to do is go the Amphoe where her house book registry is for and apply for a name change. 

The law on owning property was changed in 1998 or 1999 after the constitution of 1997 went into effect.

You are right. However, before the Amphue changes the name the marriage has to be registered with any Amphue in Thailand. It is a rule that Thais married abroad have to register their marriage in Thailand, even if both are Thais.

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