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TGIR

Wife's Thai I.D. wrong name......after 29 years???

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9 hours ago, BritTim said:

I think the issue is that she is applying for an extension of stay as a returning Thai citizen. To do this, she needs to prove that she is an existing (or former) Thai citizen. Her US passport does not demonstrate this.

After 12 years of extensions   :blink:

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18 minutes ago, Tanoshi said:
10 hours ago, BritTim said:

I think the issue is that she is applying for an extension of stay as a returning Thai citizen. To do this, she needs to prove that she is an existing (or former) Thai citizen. Her US passport does not demonstrate this.

After 12 years of extensions

The officials finally decided to insist that everything was formally by the book. They were well aware that the lady was a Thai citizen at birth, but are now insisting on documentary proof. Probably, the official in charge changed, and is a stickler for the rules.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, BritTim said:

The officials finally decided to insist that everything was formally by the book. They were well aware that the lady was a Thai citizen at birth, but are now insisting on documentary proof. Probably, the official in charge changed, and is a stickler for the rules.

I think it's far simpler than that.

 

Every year thousands of expats apply for extensions based on retirement.

As proof of residence they always submit their landlords or wife's ID, namely their Tabien Baan and ID cards.

The OP's wife entered as a US citizen and is being treated as a US citizen by Immigration (their choice).

However they've noticed an error in the name in her Thai ID that is being submitted as proof of residence.

 

It could be that simple!

Edited by Tanoshi

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On 8/11/2017 at 10:06 AM, TGIR said:

Wrong on all counts.......I don't know why you don't read the entire thread.  OJAS, did you miss the part where she is Thai?, or the part where she fills out the paperwork every year?

Well, kindly explain to me then what her being Thai and filling out the paperwork every year has to to do my comment (which was actually a reply to Evilbaz) since I am unable to see any connection.

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On 10/08/2017 at 10:49 AM, TGIR said:

Our marriage was in Bangkok, recorded in Bangkok Oct. 8, 1988.  We were also married again six months later in the U.S.A.

 

Interesting. Two marriage certificates, issued in two different countries six months apart, for marriage to the same woman. Which of the two marriage certificates does she submit with her application as evidence of being your dependent, ie your wife of foreign nationality?

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On 11/08/2017 at 4:57 AM, TGIR said:

She is my dependent and therefor has to submit the same paperwork to immigration I do.

 

If your wife has to submit the same paperwork as you do, she is not applying for an extension of stay as your dependent.

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If the foreign wife of a man on a retirement extension submits the necessary documents to satisfy immigration that the marriage is not only de jure but also de facto, immigration has no just cause to deny her application for an extension of stay as the dependent of her husband, regardless the difference in the surnames in her Thai ID and residence documents and her non-Thai passport. A call to the immigration hotline 1178 might give clarification.

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On 10/08/2017 at 2:28 PM, Evilbaz said:

If a retirement extension it has nothing to do with your wife - leave her at home then they have to deal only with you - The Applicant!

 

Reading between the lines of the OP's posts, I figure that this is all about his wife's application for an extension of stay as his dependent using her US nationality. The OP appears to be a bit confused about this. Although a dual Thai/US national as mentioned by the OP – but considering herself a "former" Thai national – she chose to enter and live in Thailand as a foreigner and now has to deal with the inconveniences this can sometimes cause.

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Another thought: Perhaps the immigration official dealing with the extension application of the OP's wife got riled by her referring to herself as a former Thai citizen. Some Thai government officials do not like this. As she still has a Thai ID card she has apparently not gone through the procedure of renouncing her Thai nationality under section 13 of the Nationality Act B.E. 2508 as amended by the Nationality Act B.E. 2551.

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The more I read this thread the more I have come to the conclusion that the OP is a master of obfuscation and confusion who derives considerable pleasure from criticising and belittling those who are unable to see through the murky waters which he has created.

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O.K. all you legal beagles.  Let's make this the last entry on this thread;  an amazing five pages of discussion and every single one of you missed the point of the post.

 

That being:  After 12 years of quarterly and annual visits, to the same immigration office, some new guy "discovers" my wife apparently should have changed her I.D. card to her married name ten years ago because of a change in the law.  Having found this egregious error, the immigration office is now requiring her to to to the Tessaban to add her American surname to her Thai I.D. card.  Not a problem, easy peasy.   But wait!  There's a catch which is the part that got my goat.

 

In addition to getting the new card that has both her Thai Surname and American Surname on it, she has to make a letter to the American Embassy explaining that she wants to use this version of her name in Thailand,  have it notarized by them in Bangkok. Then she has to take said letter to the Thai government in Bangkok and have them stamp it.  At her next annual retirement extension she shows the letter and immigration will take a copy for their records.  

 

No-one in Thailand or America will ever care that she uses an additional "middle" name on her Thai I.D. card.........except for our friend in Tha Yang, who will dutifully approve the letter by glancing at it and never paying an ounce of attention to it. 

 

29 minutes ago, OJAS said:

The more I read this thread the more I have come to the conclusion that the OP is a master of obfuscation and confusion who derives considerable pleasure from criticising and belittling those who are unable to see through the murky waters which he has created.

 

OJAS, thanks for the snarky comment.  Nice to see you are still not paying attention.

 

 

 

 

 

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TGIR

 

I am still confused as to why your wife is doing annual extensions if she is a Thai citizen.

 

Why even bother?

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30 minutes ago, TGIR said:

In addition to getting the new card that has both her Thai Surname and American Surname on it, she has to make a letter to the American Embassy explaining that she wants to use this version of her name in Thailand,  have it notarized by them in Bangkok. Then she has to take said letter to the Thai government in Bangkok and have them stamp it.  At her next annual retirement extension she shows the letter and immigration will take a copy for their records.  

 

She only needs to change the ID card to your family name so it matches what is on her US passport.

Who told you she needs to notify the embassy. That is not correct.

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14 minutes ago, Briggsy said:

TGIR

 

I am still confused as to why your wife is doing annual extensions if she is a Thai citizen.

 

Why even bother?

Having entered on a US passport, and given an appropriate permission to stay, what should she do when her permission to stay expires? Yes, it would have been better to enter Thailand using a Thai passport, but this was not done. If never intending to leave Thailand again, she could, perhaps, just go on technical overstay of her permission to stay, but I am sure there would be serious complications if she then ever wanted to use her US passport to leave Thailand.

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1 minute ago, ubonjoe said:

She only needs to change the ID card to your family name so it matches what is on her US passport.

Who told you she needs to notify the embassy. That is not correct.

I agree with you 100%.  Unfortunately the supervisor of the Tha Yang Immigration office thinks otherwise.   When asked by her subordinate she pulled a well used sheaf of yellow paper and waved it around for him to see.  He got the point.

 

I don't know why people in the Thai government (I apologize heartily for this apparent racist statement) don't know, or haven't been taught that a notarized document is only good for the purpose of identifying who signed it, not for the validation of the document's content.  (good for the validation of income though, so let's not complain too much)

 

If I weren't sick from a cold I would have got a really good laugh this morning at the antics of my darling wife asking me in various ways, including waving and jumping up and down, "don't you understand this is the Thai way?  Don't you understand this is Thailand?  What's the matter with you??????????

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BANGKOK 13 December 2017 21:42
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