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obagz88

wanting to learn basic south words

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obagz88    1

hi all 

names Owen

i have a girlfriend from Nakhon Si Thammarat and i am trying to learn some of the words they use in replace of central thai words ie ( very much = jung hoo in stead of mak mak  ) she try to teach me but i forget if not able to read the words . not great at remembering things i'm just told .

can any one help me with some study cards 

( english = central =southern ) something like this style i find easy to learn 

( ie --- very delicious = aroi mak mak ( อร่อยมาก ) = rhøi jung hoo ( หร้อยจังฮู้ )

my girlfriend try's so hard and i would love to show here how much i'm really trying to learn her and her culture of the south, and  love  if some one could help 

mans please try not get to side tracked on  differences between words and north south  east i'm worried all that will do is confuse me more 

thanks heaps 

owen from australia 

 

ขอขอบคุณครับ

 

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lemonjelly    4,048

Mai plerrr..... never mind

Gin kao ler mai?....... eaten yet?

Mai gin tee..... not eaten yet

Lob baan...... go home

Bia... (sounds like beer).... cash

 

 

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cornishcarlos    5,204

PM me a list of what you want and I'll ask my wife to translate into Southern Thai for you...

It seems to me they just cut a huge chunk of words off, lazy buggers :)

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obagz88    1
6 minutes ago, lemonjelly said:

Mai plerrr..... never mind
Gin kao ler yang ?..... eaten yet?
Mai gin tee..... not eaten yet
Lob baan...... go home
Bia... (sounds like beer).... cash


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

thank you so much 

as much as you can give will expand my  vocabulary  thank you

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South    240

..... and herein is where the problems begin

 

Genuine Southern Thai is a diverse mixture of bastardized Thai, slang Thai, Northern Malay, and local regional dialect. Mix in a little bit of Indian as well and you are on your way to learning. There are also differing versions of Southern Thai, Ligor and Chayai being two. I think there are 4 or 5 in total. For example some eastern provinces, NST, Trang and Phattalung have slightly different vocabulary than say Phangnga or Ranong. Same again once you get down to the very deep south of Thailand and the northern Malayan states. Then there are the tones to think about, the situations and then to the age of the person you are talking to and then ................................... I tried and tried and tried to learn but failed miserably. Gave up in the end.

 

 

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Joosesis    6

I have been wanting to learn more southern Thai for a while now.  When I first began learning Thai in Trang (a kazillion years ago), the exchange company asked that everyone in the village speak central Thai to me.  This was immensely helpful at the beginning, but I am ready to dive deeper into southern Thai now.

 

At a bookshop in Trang, I did find one dictionary that is central Thai to southern Thai.  It is somewhat helpful with written language, but I would like to develop more of my spoken language skills.

 

I'm wondering if it is worth moving this (mods?) to the Thai language forum and pin it so we could keep this going.  

 

I am also interested in learning this with written Thai so I can understand the pronunciation better than decoding everyone's phonetic attempt:    ไม่เป็นไร = ไม่พรื่อ (as someone wrote Mai plerrr)

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Joosesis    6

At a bookshop in Trang, I did find one dictionary that is central Thai to southern Thai.  It is somewhat helpful with written language, but I would like to develop more of my spoken language skills.



I finally got around to taking a picture of the book, including a peak inside. 20170814_114355.jpg20170814_114451.jpg


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Mosha    5,138
..... and herein is where the problems begin
 
Genuine Southern Thai is a diverse mixture of bastardized Thai, slang Thai, Northern Malay, and local regional dialect. Mix in a little bit of Indian as well and you are on your way to learning. There are also differing versions of Southern Thai, Ligor and Chayai being two. I think there are 4 or 5 in total. For example some eastern provinces, NST, Trang and Phattalung have slightly different vocabulary than say Phangnga or Ranong. Same again once you get down to the very deep south of Thailand and the northern Malayan states. Then there are the tones to think about, the situations and then to the age of the person you are talking to and then ................................... I tried and tried and tried to learn but failed miserably. Gave up in the end.
 
 
Wife is a Nakhon native, and we live in Ranong, La-Un. From what she tells me there is a lot of NST blood here, but she always pucks it out. She generally will ask where they are from. It gets to be a long chat if its Pak Phanang.

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Pdaz    2,338
On 8/11/2017 at 8:12 AM, cornishcarlos said:

PM me a list of what you want and I'll ask my wife to translate into Southern Thai for you...

It seems to me they just cut a huge chunk of words off, lazy buggers :)

Yep... That about sums it up.  My other half is also from the South.. :laugh:

 

Sabai dee -  bai dee

Talaat - laat

Sanook - nook

Aroi - roi

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Gordons    4

I'm just outside Sichon for a month or so around December. Best way is to talk and listen to the family and not bother with other dialects at all. A few southern directional tips when driving (which follow the same theory as shortening stuff):

 

go straight - drong  ( or if excited, drong, drong. They drop the pai)

 

Turn Right - quaw ( no need for leaw)

 

Turn left - sai (ditto)

 

Stop - top, top, top (strangely not just the one "top", or maybe that's just my over exuberant driving)

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BANGKOK 18 August 2017 15:50
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