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Aussie father and son electrocuted to death in Rayong

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RIP to them, tragic. Lots of presumptuous posts here. How do you know it was not falty wiring that caused issue. He was found with a wrench in his hand? Hardly the tool for electrical work.

In my wifes house, builders complained the roof gave them a shock, I tested an dit was live !! No main isolator/fuse, no earthing, no rcd, and all cables in roof twisted together and not insulated at all! Oh and sypply straight from a meter across road only 2m up a post and terminals open to the elements !!!!

I donned a pair of gloves and disconnected supply to house, wired new board with rcd's and min isolator also and installed earth rod and fitted junction boxes everywhere.

Then removed all joined cables which were on garden floor and fitted outdoor lights and put cable overhead in piping!!! Some holiday that was but I would not have slept back in UK had I left that place like a death trap with kids running round.

 

 

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Condolences to the guys' family.  This is a sad cautionary tale, and I'd like the input from any sparkies about these socket testers for use in LOS:

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/peakmeter-pm6860er-automatic-electric-socket-tester-neutral-liveearth-wire-testing-rcd-test-uk-plug-230v-intl-8078318.html

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/duoyi-dy207-220-230v-detection-testingleakage-protection-test-safety-electrical-socket-tester-rcd-plug-eu-europe-version-14573684.html

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/peakmeter-pm6860e-automatic-electric-220v-250v-united-kingdomplug-socket-testercolorblack-intl-28274528.html

 

Please keep in mind I'm not endorsing any of them, but $10 seems cheap for DIY testing the sockets in a home and possibly prevent a tragedy.

 

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6 hours ago, oldwelshman said:

He was found with a wrench in his hand? Hardly the tool for electrical work.

But it can be a plumbing tool... and he was working on the swimming pool pump. Maybe tightening a leaking coupling or flange with the pump power still on? Just shows that even the most mundane of tasks in Thailand needs a Risk Assessment carried out, especially if there's electricity around.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, impulse said:

Condolences to the guys' family.  This is a sad cautionary tale, and I'd like the input from any sparkies about these socket testers for use in LOS:

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/peakmeter-pm6860er-automatic-electric-socket-tester-neutral-liveearth-wire-testing-rcd-test-uk-plug-230v-intl-8078318.html

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/duoyi-dy207-220-230v-detection-testingleakage-protection-test-safety-electrical-socket-tester-rcd-plug-eu-europe-version-14573684.html

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/peakmeter-pm6860e-automatic-electric-220v-250v-united-kingdomplug-socket-testercolorblack-intl-28274528.html

 

Please keep in mind I'm not endorsing any of them, but $10 seems cheap for DIY testing the sockets in a home and possibly prevent a tragedy.

 

I bought something similar in the UK a while ago to check out the electricals in the newly built home. Unfortunately, it appears that the Thai convention for the 'L' and 'N' pins follows the US standard and is reversed from the UK and EU standard.

 

But the grounds are all correct... if you have any.

Edited by NanLaew

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Everything in LOS is half ass,  electrical, plumbing, mechanics, you name it, all back yard boys with a certificate out of the Kellogs Cornflake packet. Prefer doing my own work, that way I know its done correctly to my own country's standard.

I strongly urge everybody to have a safety cut switch added to their circuit  breakers or a complete new board wire by somebody who knows what they are doing.

RIP to my OZ countrymen.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, NanLaew said:

Thai convention for the 'L' and 'N' pins follows the US standard and is reversed from the UK and EU standard.

I was at a house one time in Sattahip where the owner told me got a belt of a socket while wiring up his stereo. It turned out the L and N has been reversed somewhere on the pole aways down the street. So although he had turned off the breaker. What he had actually isolated was the neutral. So to all intents and purposes the circuit in his house was dead because nothing worked, but it was still live if one touched the wrong wire.

 

It pays to use insulated tools until one is absolutely sure.

Edited by VocalNeal
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With a separate pumphouse near the gate you wonder if it was wired in BEFORE any circuit breakers ..... Also no explanation as to how the metal gate was electrified. As said, electrical installations in Thailand are scary. My wife will not even let me change a light bulb! (ATM must never be put at risk).

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1 hour ago, rickudon said:

With a separate pumphouse near the gate you wonder if it was wired in BEFORE any circuit breakers ..... Also no explanation as to how the metal gate was electrified. As said, electrical installations in Thailand are scary. My wife will not even let me change a light bulb! (ATM must never be put at risk).

Possible. I mentioned earlier that I had an air conditioner hot-wired to the main service coming to the property. Throw the house main breaker and it kept running!

 

The gate wasn't electrified. In lieu of a separately wired ground on the pool pump installation, the gate was the path to ground, ie. the current passed from the live appliance, through both victims to ground via the gate. Most fatal shocks are ones that cross the body, disrupting the heartbeat whereas someone may easily survive a 'belt' when their hand touches something live but their elbow or upper arm is (touching something) grounded. In that instance, the current path avoids the heart. Unfortunately, when higher currents are encountered, muscles will contract which is why it is very common for someone holding something that becomes live or another part of their body enables a better current path to ground, they will grip the live item. This is why, in lieu of confirming that the current source has been totally deactivated, they recommend any intervention such as moving the live item or even moving the victim should be done with a dry piece of wood.

 

If the current cannot be cut-off or it takes too long due to the switch being far away, try to disengage the electrocuted person using any non-conducting element (board, strip of wood, rope, wooden chair, leather belt, stick or dry branch, etc.) to grab hold of the wire or the injured person from a distance, or grab his clothes, provided the first-aider is well insulated.

 

Electrocutions in a wet environment are the most dangerous to tackle and typically result in higher fatalities.

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9 hours ago, VocalNeal said:

I was at a house one time in Sattahip where the owner told me got a belt of a socket while wiring up his stereo. It turned out the L and N has been reversed somewhere on the pole aways down the street. So although he had turned off the breaker. What he had actually isolated was the neutral. So to all intents and purposes the circuit in his house was dead because nothing worked, but it was still live if one touched the wrong wire.

 

It pays to use insulated tools until one is absolutely sure.

A correct double pole isolator isolates live and neutral so would provide safe working.

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, NanLaew said:

I bought something similar in the UK a while ago to check out the electricals in the newly built home. Unfortunately, it appears that the Thai convention for the 'L' and 'N' pins follows the US standard and is reversed from the UK and EU standard.

 

But the grounds are all correct... if you have any.

 

Is that a genuine PEA standard, or what you found?  I'm reading here some instances where someone disconnected the power- (I'm thinking at the breaker?), and only the ground (or neutral) was disconnected and the circuit remained live through what should have been the neutral.  It would surprise me to find the actual standard to be reverse, though I wouldn't be surprised at all to find that a lot of installations are reversed -either before the incoming panel or in the panel itself- since there are so many 2 prong outlets.  (I miss the USA 3 prong outlets, both from a standardization of plugs and knowing which side is the neutral regardless of the orientation of the wall outlet and how many extension cords I daisy chain...)

 

And I do admit that I am often surprised...

 

Edited by impulse

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2 hours ago, impulse said:

Is that a genuine PEA standard, or what you found?

See below, a locally bought wall socket. With reference to the ground pin, the US and Thai convention is reversed from the UK and EU one. Using the polarity checkers from lazada with integrated UK and EU plugs will give a L/N fault light on an otherwise correctly wired Thai outlet.

 

599663ee2e052_thaisocket.jpg.7bb5929e0a02abf9ba211fffd99da2e6.jpg

 

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On ‎8‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 2:19 PM, MadMuhammad said:

So sad. There's just no second chances when it comes to playing with electricity. RIP. Thoughts are with the family.

Not quite correct. Install an RCD between outside main feed and the breaker box and it will save your life. One saved mine 3 times.

 

I wonder if he had any experience in electrical stuff? The village "electrician" that wired up a switch for the family house had no clue, and I had to put a breaker into the circuit. Neither did the "electrician" that used a I foot steel rod for the earth when I had him install a hot water heater. I had to redo his work as well.

 

Anyway, RIP to the 2 guys, and condolence to the family. Tragic.

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4 hours ago, NanLaew said:

See below, a locally bought wall socket. With reference to the ground pin, the US and Thai convention is reversed from the UK and EU one. Using the polarity checkers from lazada with integrated UK and EU plugs will give a L/N fault light on an otherwise correctly wired Thai outlet.

 

599663ee2e052_thaisocket.jpg.7bb5929e0a02abf9ba211fffd99da2e6.jpg

 

Not sure what you mean by "polarity checker" but I used one of those screwdrivers with a bulb in it to check for live wires. Costs a few baht at any electrical store.

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6 hours ago, impulse said:

 

Is that a genuine PEA standard, or what you found?  I'm reading here some instances where someone disconnected the power- (I'm thinking at the breaker?), and only the ground (or neutral) was disconnected and the circuit remained live through what should have been the neutral.  It would surprise me to find the actual standard to be reverse, though I wouldn't be surprised at all to find that a lot of installations are reversed -either before the incoming panel or in the panel itself- since there are so many 2 prong outlets.  (I miss the USA 3 prong outlets, both from a standardization of plugs and knowing which side is the neutral regardless of the orientation of the wall outlet and how many extension cords I daisy chain...)

 

And I do admit that I am often surprised...

 

Nothing surprised me when I was rewiring my ex's family houses. One time I found that when the light switch was off, the wire to the bulb was still live. Twisted wire joins with tape and reversing the live wire with what should have been neutral was common.

In the BIL's house, they wired up a plug direct from the outside main feed and put a knife breaker into the circuit. Unfortunately, they omitted to put the cover over it, which made it lethal to anyone rummaging around in the garage, as I was doing. Only by the grace of the deity.......................

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14 hours ago, oldwelshman said:

A correct double pole isolator isolates live and neutral so would provide safe working.

Correct, but I always turned the wire that I was working on off at the breaker so I could still  use power tools and lights etc.

However, I did check the wire was not live before doing anything.

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BANGKOK 13 December 2017 08:27
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