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Aussie father and son electrocuted to death in Rayong

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On ‎8‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 3:13 PM, VocalNeal said:

I was at a house one time in Sattahip where the owner told me got a belt of a socket while wiring up his stereo. It turned out the L and N has been reversed somewhere on the pole aways down the street. So although he had turned off the breaker. What he had actually isolated was the neutral. So to all intents and purposes the circuit in his house was dead because nothing worked, but it was still live if one touched the wrong wire.

 

It pays to use insulated tools until one is absolutely sure.

One should always check if a wire is live, even if the mains switch is off, wherever one is. Easily done with a voltmeter or one of those circuit testers that cost a few baht at the hardware store.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Not quite correct. Install an RCD between outside main feed and the breaker box and it will save your life. One saved mine 3 times.

 

I wonder if he had any experience in electrical stuff? The village "electrician" that wired up a switch for the family house had no clue, and I had to put a breaker into the circuit. Neither did the "electrician" that used a I foot steel rod for the earth when I had him install a hot water heater. I had to redo his work as well.

 

Anyway, RIP to the 2 guys, and condolence to the family. Tragic.

While I understand and agree, to some extent RCD's are not entirely foolproof, depends on the fault conditions. 

 

You should consider yourself lucky you had any firm of earthing installed lol

Edited by MadMuhammad

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Of course this is a serious and tragic accident. Am I wrong for thinking in this case that if the mains elctricity supply was turned off, cannot suffer from shock or electrocution?

whenever I do anything  remotely connected with electricity i automatically turn off the mains.

 

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On ‎20‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 9:30 AM, ChrisKC said:

Of course this is a serious and tragic accident. Am I wrong for thinking in this case that if the mains elctricity supply was turned off, cannot suffer from shock or electrocution?

whenever I do anything  remotely connected with electricity i automatically turn off the mains.

 

Yes you are wrong. If the switch is other side of what is being worked on it will still be live. In thiland no way of knowing where the supply comes from, always test befor touching any bare conductor. Marrigold gloves and insulated tools help just in case ;-)

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On 8/18/2017 at 10:51 AM, NanLaew said:

See below, a locally bought wall socket. With reference to the ground pin, the US and Thai convention is reversed from the UK and EU one. Using the polarity checkers from lazada with integrated UK and EU plugs will give a L/N fault light on an otherwise correctly wired Thai outlet.

 

599663ee2e052_thaisocket.jpg.7bb5929e0a02abf9ba211fffd99da2e6.jpg

 

Not sure if someone else posted this, but with the flat prongs N is wider than L, as this socket shows.

But with many round prong leads there is no difference.

electricals are one of the banes of my life here in lo(n)s, (land of no safety)

so many unsafe sub par BS ratings products

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33 minutes ago, kaorop said:

Not sure if someone else posted this, but with the flat prongs N is wider than L, as this socket shows.

But with many round prong leads there is no difference.

electricals are one of the banes of my life here in lo(n)s, (land of no safety)

so many unsafe sub par BS ratings products

Yes, the original Thai power outlets and plugs copied American ones and had the wider Neutral pin/socket and most name brand hardware still carries this convention. However, in addition to the non-polarized round pin "Schuko" plugs/sockets from Europe, there's a whole lot of cheap, locally made flat-pin plugs and sockets that have the same sized flat pins so unless they are 3-pin, the polarity problem resurfaces.

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12 hours ago, NanLaew said:

Yes, the original Thai power outlets and plugs copied American ones and had the wider Neutral pin/socket and most name brand hardware still carries this convention. However, in addition to the non-polarized round pin "Schuko" plugs/sockets from Europe, there's a whole lot of cheap, locally made flat-pin plugs and sockets that have the same sized flat pins so unless they are 3-pin, the polarity problem resurfaces.

Quite correct on the flat pin cheap stuff. 

With so many pitfalls of these products add in the danger of Elec, low skill and poor installations and flooding people must be dying or seriously injured from electrocution at very high rate. But like many things here the stats, would be inaccurate at best and deliberately fudged at worst.

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Always obtain  the services of a genuine pool  professional for  installations of electrical  equipment for  swimming pools.

SwimmingPoolsThailand carries out  installtions strictly  to  European and Australian electrical  codes of practice.

 

Many  houses in  Thailand, even modern ones, are not  equipped with RCCB/GFC. Check  your  consumer unit  to  be sure.

 

See: http://swimmingpoolsthailand.com/en/144-din-rail-components

or contact  a certified electrical  store.

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On 8/15/2017 at 8:32 PM, jorj44 said:

I don't want to be seen as insensitive, or a pedant, but I do want to be of assistance to the sub-editor.

 

The word "electrocution" was coined at the time of the adoption of the electric chair and is a contraction of the words electric execution.

 

The sub-editors' scourge is the tautology, and look what he has gone and done.

and in common contemporary usage is used to include accidental death - which according to Webster's is the primary definition.

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BANGKOK 12 December 2017 11:20
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